Face Down in a Memory

This is for Erika and reading Roseanne Cash’s memoir, and for all of our e-talk this week about memory, aging, aches, and poetry.  Who else but a poet could write “face down in a memory but feeling alright”?

Here’s the NYT review of her memoir.

 

SEVEN YEAR ACHE

You act like you were just born tonight
Face down in a memory but feeling all right
So who does your past belong to today?
Baby, you don’t say nothing when you’re feeling this way

The girls in the bars thinking, “who is this guy?”
But they don’t think nothing when they’re telling you lies
You look so careless when they’re shooting that bull
Don’t you know heartaches are heroes when their pockets are full

Tell me you’re trying to cure a seven-year ache
See what else your old heart can take
The boys say, “when is he gonna give us some room”
The girls say, “god I hope he comes back soon”

Everybody’s talking but you don’t hear a thing
You’re still uptown on your downhill swing
Boulevard’s empty, why don’t you come around?
Baby, what is so great about sleeping downtown?

Splitting your dice to be someone you’re not
You say you’re looking for something you might’ve forgot
Don’t bother calling to say you’re leaving alone
‘Cause there’s a fool on every corner when you’re trying to get home

Just tell ’em you’re trying to cure a seven-year ache
See what else your old heart can take
The boys say, “when is he gonna give us some room”
The girls say, “god I hope he comes back soon”

Tell me you’re trying to cure a seven-year ache
See what else your old heart can take
The boys say, “when is he gonna give us some room”
The girls say, “god I hope he comes back soon”

Lyrics found at:  http://www.cowboylyrics.com/lyrics/cash-rosanne/seven-year-ache-3189.html

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15 thoughts on “Face Down in a Memory

  1. amyg

    possibly in my top ten of favorite songs ever.

    (i know i’ve been quiet, but i’ve been reading. besides being all class, ernie els also has a great name–how could he be anything but a golfer with a name like that?)

  2. erikamarks

    You are too good to me, Teri–thank you.

    It has been so fascinating to read about her process of writing. Interesting (an unlike tabloid memoirs that languish on the gory details) she is very sparse when it comes to the personal details of her marriage (though she is wonderfully effusive about her daughters and how much they mean to her) but the joy of the book is the insight to how she writes, and the constant drive TO write, knowing even as she pursued other things, that her compulsion to write wouldn’t go away.

    I’ve been very inspired by it.

  3. josephinecarr

    Off the subject: a bunch of y’all’s posts, which I usually receive in my inbox, have been shunting off to the Trash. Does anyone know how to stop this travesty?

  4. Sherry Stanfa-Stanley

    I’m almost ashamed to admit I’ve never listened to a single song by her. And now I must expand my horizons.

    Wow. Fabulous.

    I gave up on writing poetry in my college days. But occasionally I still try to write song lyrics (usually right after a great concert). I can never manage to capture the intent and emotion in such a succinct collection of words.

    I’m in awe of those who can. Thanks for sharing.

    1. Teri Post author

      Oh Sherry, that reminds me — as a kid I used to lie on the living room floor with headphones on and, notebook in hand, try to get down the lyrics of songs.

      But write poetry on my own? Not so much … I admire poets from afar.

  5. Lyra

    I love that song.

    There is something so beautiful about a bunch of musicians sitting up on stage just grooving and enjoying someone else’s song with as much pleasure as we, the audience, get from it.

    I could watch musicians all day long. Every day. Talk about magic.

    1. Teri Post author

      When I first saw this, I missed the obvious: on stage we’ve got Roseanne, John Mellencamp, Kris Kristofferson, Elvis Costello, and Norah Jones. Jesus. Talk about song writing star power.

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